Tag ai

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Liked Gareth Halfacree (@ghalfacree@mastodon.social)
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Attached: 2 images Google, following the industry trend to AI-all-the-things, has released Magika - a machine learning model which can identify file types. It claims it can outperform traditional methods by 20 per cent. I pitted it against BSD File on something I figured Google hadn't included in its million-file-strong corpus: CU Amiga's Mega CD-ROM coverdisc from November 1995. Magika identified... one file correctly, a plain-text document. File? File got 'em all, and quicker too. (An unfair test, I know!)

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Liked james BSc ADHD ASD (@james@strangeobject.space)
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Who on earth is going to click the AI button purposefully on a Windows Keyboard. Also, how the fuck did this get accepted? You’re modifying the experience of long time users of Microsoft devices for a stinking key to open a stinking thing that will be dead in a few years. You are really gonna pay to manufacturer all these keyboards? You’re gonna be the first person to have to sunset a physical device? More money than sense

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Reposted Lincoln Russell (@linc@phpc.social)
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If I installed new server software that served websites 500% faster but also crashed sometimes, your first question would be "how frequent are the crashes?" and if I shrugged you'd back away slowly and start looking for my replacement. But with LLMs & hallucinations that's just normal operating conditions and you're a luddite if you ask too much about it.

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Reposted jwz (@jwz@mastodon.social)
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Someone defended the Plagiarism Machine to me the other day by saying that the people who are going to use it weren't going to pay artists in the first place, they were just going to go to the second page of Image Search and steal something from there anyway. But the categorical difference is that in the old way, there was a non-zero chance of getting caught. The Plagiarism Machine makes that impossible because it is a copyright laundry.

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Reposted Mike (@mikestreety@hachyderm.io)
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Anyone else see "AI" and just switch off? If I'm looking for some new software or a SaaS, or I open an article and it mentions AI, I immediately go back or close the tab. I'm just so fed up of it appearing in *everything*. I get it has a use (I wouldn't even say it's a purpose) but it seems some products have gone hard on it and I'm just bored of hearing about it now.

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Reposted Ian Rose (@ianrosewrites@scicomm.xyz)
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People in security and computing have been saying for years - there's no cloud. There's just someone else's computer. Right now, there's no AI. There's just someone else's work. Stop calling generative text and image programs AI. It's inaccurate and insulting. They are just the evolution of corporate creative theft that's been going on as long as media corporations have existed.

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Liked Random Geek (@randomgeek@hackers.town)
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I think I figured out an aesthetic reason why AI-in-everything has been annoying the hell out of me. They're all using the same API from the same source — okay maybe two or three sources but mostly not — converging all their interesting and distinct services into one indistinguishable oatmeal mashup. Oh you can help me write emails? How is that different from the ten other apps that hook up to ChatGPT to help me write emails?

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Reposted Jacky Alciné (@jalcine@todon.eu)
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Attached: 1 image Okay now I really need to block Google and Microsoft from anything I touch. It's been clear that this AI stuff is moving like a virus, but it's not like any disclosures are even given for this. https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/interactive/2023/ai-chatbot-learning/#lookup-table

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