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Reposted james (@james@strangeobject.space)
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Basically if you’re losing sleep over the fact you don’t like a Q* or you think there are too many groups represented on a flag then I’d like to congratulate you on your comfortable life and suggest you put the energy you have for arguing against representation into something more useful. If it doesn’t hurt anyone beyond making you personally uncomfortable that is decidedly a YOU problem. *I am aware of the “queer was used as a slur against me and thus it’s painful for me to see” but your discomfort can be healed through reclamation of language and community support, rather than force others to be uncomfortable and disincluded because you don’t like the way they refer to themself. I am not aware of any valid arguments on why we should not add black, brown, trans, intersex and whatever future styleguide updates come to the progress flag.

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Reposted Joscelyn Transpiring (@JoscelynTransient@chaosfem.tw)
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I still think corporations have Pride Month backwards: this isn't a month to make money off me, this is a month to give me discounts for doing the public service of being this gay! I should be able to walk into any Target and get 30% off by kissing another girl or showing the cute bandaid from where I did my HRT shot! I should get free coffee at starbucks for walking in with carabiners and a fanny pack! I should be able to demand any random driver pull over and become a free uber by waving a rainbow flag so I can go spread my gayness across the city! Strangers should just hand me a twenty because I'm slouching bisexually in public!?! #RainbowCapitalism #Queer #PrideMonth #Pride

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Reposted Hannah, sometimes 🏳️‍⚧️ (@Hannah@chaosfem.tw)
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The other day at work, in an online meeting, a fuckhead said the phrase “Well, it’s probably because she’s a woman and she doesn’t know what the hell she’s talking about”, referring to an external contractor. I’m not out, but I stopped the meeting and said “You don’t get to talk like that in front of me. Now, I have to call HR.” There was laughter. To which I replied sternly, “It is not funny. Do better.” There was no laughter then. I don’t put up with that shit. Misogyny, any kind of trans- or queer- based phobia, racism. None. That’s how you ally - you speak up. You challenge the notion that these fuckers are in a safe place. You DO have power to create change. Be the voice for the voiceless. Afterwards, two of the other attendees reached out to me to thank for my courage to stand up to one of the “cool kids”. I don’t need thanks, I need people to be better. BE BETTER.

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Reposted Kyle Rankin (@kyle@kylerank.in)
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Burnout in the FOSS community is real, and I'm glad that it's something that is being talked about more in blogs and conferences. There is a different flavor of burnout and emotional toll when you are sacrificing for a cause you believe in (especially in FOSS where people are often working for free or at below market rate). Working for a cause you believe in brings the highest highs when things are going well, but the lowest lows when they go badly. #FOSS #burnout

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Listened to Weighing open source project funding options, from taxes to anarchy | IT Ops Query by PodBean Development 
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Justin Warren is founder and principal analyst at PivotNine, a technology consulting and analyst firm based in Melbourne, Australia. Until 2023, he was a board member at Electronic Frontiers Australia, a non-profit national organization representing Internet users. At KubeCon North America last year, he asked a press conference panel of enterprise IT leaders what they were doing to compensate open source maintainers "so they don't starve to death."A self-described "filthy socialist," Warren favors a tax or tax-like system for funding open source libraries that are widely used but not full-fledged products -- especially when the alternative is an offer from a malicious actor maintainers can't refuse. Together, Warren and Beth explore various approaches to shoring up the maintenance, security and sustainability of open source software and discuss the future outlook for the industry in this episode.

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Reposted james (@james@strangeobject.space)
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Do Not Reply cards and other mechanisms used to explicitly outline what interactions are unwelcome to a post are called “boundaries”. Boundaries are good. They are good for bother the setter and the receiver. It is loving to tell someone what is not welcome, and loving to have them respected. If you are upset that someone is stating a boundary, it is likely that you are not familiar with boundaries and I’d like to tell you that you too deserve to both set them and have them respected.

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Reposted mooreds (@mooreds@ruby.social)
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Want to succeed as a new developer? I wrote a book about that! Topics include: - When the best code is no code - What to do in the first month of your job - The pitfalls of working alone Buy it for $17 (ebook or softcover) now through May 31: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-1-4842-6074-6

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Reposted OpenUK (@openuk@hachyderm.io)
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Attached: 1 image The Open Manifesto 2024 is our asks of the next government. Supported by signing up as an individual or organisation and show your commitment to UK open source. Read, sign, and share The Open Manifesto. https://openuk.uk/openmanifesto/ #openuk #opensource #OpenManifesto #ukeleciton

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Listened to Why speed of iteration made buying incident.io the right choice with John Paris of Skyscanner by The Debrief by incident.io
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This week, we're sharing an extra special episode. It's no secret that the decision to buy or build isn't exactly a straightforward one. And the decision you make can be influenced by a ton of factors. But the fact is that in some instances, buying can make more sense than building, and in others, building can make more sense than buying. In this episode, you'll hear from John Paris, Principal Engineer at Skyscanner, to get the story behind their build versus buy journey. Joining him as the host for this episode is none other than the CPO of incident IO, Chris Evans. In their conversation, Chris and John discuss Skyscanner's setup before adopting incident.io, what life has been like after adopting the platform, and a whole lot more.

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Listened to Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 429 - The autonomy of open source developers
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and talk about open source and autonomy. This is even related to some recent return to office news. The conversation weaves between a few threads, but fundamentally there's some questions about why do people do what they do, especially in the world of open source. This also is a problem we see in security, security people love to tell developers what to do. Developers don't like being told what to do. Show Notes